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Answered 2009-09-25 19:49:28

0 belongs to the reals. It is a member of the irrationals, the rationals. It is also a member of the integers;

It is a member (the identity) of the group of even integers, 3*integers, 4*integers etc with respect to addition.

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Any set that contains it! It belongs to {0}, or {45, sqrt(2), 0, pi, -3/7}, or all whole numbers between -43 and 53,or multiples of 5, or integers,or rational numbers, or rational numbers smaller than 6.3,or real numbers,or complex numbers, etc.


0 is a real number because it is part of the whole, integer, and rational number family which is in the section under real numbers (not imaginary).


To any set that contains it! It belongs to {0}, or {45, 0, sqrt(2), pi, -3/7}, or {0, bananas, France, cold} or all whole numbers between -43 and 53, or multiples of 5, or integers, or rational numbers, or real numbers, or complex numbers, etc.


Yes. 0 divided by any real number (including rational numbers, which are a subset of the real numbers) is 0.


To any set that contains it! It belongs to {0.25}, or {45, sqrt(2), pi, -3/7, 0.25}, or multiples of 0.05, or fractions between 0 and 1, or reciprocals, or rational numbers, or real numbers, or complex numbers, etc.


AnswerAlpaca belongs to a camel family.



Yes. 0 is an integer and all integers are real numbers.


Yes. :S real numbers are real numbers. 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.


The set of real numbers contains an additive identity - which is denoted by zero - such that, for all real numbers, x, x + 0 = 0 + x = x.


The mathematically correct answer is: any set that contains it. For example, it belongs to the set of all numbers between -3 and +2, the set {0, -3, 8/13, sqrt(97), pi}, the set {0}, the set of the roots of x3 - x2 + x = 0, the set of all integers, the set of all rational numbers, the set of all real numbers, the set of all complex numbers.


No. All rational numbers are real. Rational numbers are numbers that can be written as a fraction.


In the context of real numbers, only the number 0.


There are an almost infinite number of real numbers between 0 and 1.


Zero is an integer which belongs to the sets of rational, real and complex numbers. It is the additive identity which means that, for any other number n, n + 0 = n = 0 + n. There is no such thing as a constituent on zero.


A real answer is a number that consists of these numbers: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 or 0)


It could be either depending on the function that you have.


Closure: The sum of two real numbers is always a real number. Associativity: If a,b ,c are real numbers, then (a+b)+c = a+(b+c) Identity: 0 is the identity element since 0+a=a and a+0=a for any real number a. Inverse: Every real number (a) has an additive inverse (-a) since a + (-a) = 0 Those are the four requirements for a group.


It is the additive identity for integers, rational numbers, real numbers, complex numbers.


Rational and irrational numbers are real numbers. A complex number is represented by a+bi where a and b are real numbers. Zero is a real number therefore any real number is also complex whenever b=0


Real numbers are commutative under addition (and subtraction) so a + b - a = a - a + b The set of Real numbers includes an additive identity, 0, such that a - a = 0 so a - a + b = 0 + b The additive identity also has the property that 0 + b = b [= b + 0] so 0 + b = b


All real numbers, except 0, have a multiplicative inverse. For any real x, (x not = 0), there exists a real number y such that x*y = 1. This y is denoted by 1/x.


The domain is all real numbers, and the range is nonnegative real numbers (y ≥ 0).


The set of real numbers is a subset of the set of complex numbers. For the set of complex numbers, given in the form (a + bi), where a and b can be any real number, the number is only a real number, if b = 0.


The complement of a set refers to everything that is NOT in the set. A "universe" (a set from which elements may be taken) must always be specified (perhaps implicitly). For example, if your "universe" is the real numbers, and the set you are considering is 0 The complement of a set refers to everything that is NOT in the set. A "universe" (a set from which elements may be taken) must always be specified (perhaps implicitly). For example, if your "universe" is the real numbers, and the set you are considering is 0 The complement of a set refers to everything that is NOT in the set. A "universe" (a set from which elements may be taken) must always be specified (perhaps implicitly). For example, if your "universe" is the real numbers, and the set you are considering is 0 The complement of a set refers to everything that is NOT in the set. A "universe" (a set from which elements may be taken) must always be specified (perhaps implicitly). For example, if your "universe" is the real numbers, and the set you are considering is 0



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