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Yes, but you would need to know a degree measure too.

[Sin(A)/a] = [Sin(B)/b] = [Sin(C)/c]

[a/Sin(A)] = [b/Sin(B)] = [c/Sin(C)]

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โˆ™ 2011-09-22 03:13:45
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During the 1930s the new deal legislation was proposed by president Franklin Roosevelt to bring the US out of the great depression

What economic function does the government attempt to correct for in market failures like monopolies

Protection from foreign enemies is established in the Constitutional promise to provide for what

The sharing of ideas and experimental findings with others

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Q: Can you use the law of sines if 3 sides are given?
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Describe the three situations when you can use the Law of Sines?

The tricky part of the law of sines is knowing when you are able to use it. Whether you can use the law of Sine's or not depends on what information you have or were given. In some cases the information you were given could make two different triangles. There are three times when you can use the law of sines. One example of when you can use it is when you have the length of a side and the measures of both the angles that that side is adjacent to. This is called angle side angle or asa for short. Another time when you can use the law of sines is when you are given the measures of two angles and a side that is outside the angles. This is called aas. Finally the last case where you can use the law of sines is when you have two side lengths and the measure of an angle. Math teachers refer to this one as ssa, I remember that this one is special. If you are given the measure of an angle and two sides you could have two different triangles.


When can you use the sine law?

The tricky part of the law of sines is knowing when you are able to use it. Whether you can use the law of Sine's or not depends on what information you have or were given. In some cases the information you were given could make two different triangles. There are three times when you can use the law of sines. One example of when you can use it is when you have the length of a side and the measures of both the angles that that side is adjacent to. This is called angle side angle or asa for short. Another time when you can use the law of sines is when you are given the measures of two angles and a side that is outside the angles. This is called aas. Finally the last case where you can use the law of sines is when you have two side lengths and the measure of an angle. Math teachers refer to this one as ssa, I remember that this one is special. If you are given the measure of an angle and two sides you could have two different triangles.


When do you use law of sine?

There are several cases when you would want to use the law of sines. When you have angle angle side, angle side angle, or angle side side you would use the law of sines.


How do you find a missing side of a triangle without a right angle?

Having sufficient angles or sides one can use either, The Law of Sines, or, The Law of Cosines. Google them.


How do you find an unknown angle of a triangle without having a length of one of the sides using sohcahtoa?

If you have the length of two of the sides and one other angle you can use the law of sines.


When do you use law of sines and law of cos sines?

Use Law of Sines if you know:Two angle measures and any side length orTwo side lengths and a non-included angle measure.Use Law of Cosines if you know:Two side lengths and the included angle measure orThree side lengths.


Proof of 30-60-90 theorem?

Use the law of sines.


How do you use the law of sines?

The Law of Sines can be used to find unknown parts (a side or angle) of a triangle. For example if you know 2 angles and a side, or if you know 2 sides and 1 angle (depending on how they are oriented). Visit the Maths Is Fun site (link posted below) for a more graphical explanation.


Can you use the Law of Sines to find a missing angle measure in this triangular roof?

no #9


How do you find the unknown angle of a triangle?

If you have two other angles, then add up those 2 and subtract that from 180. if you have all 3 sides then use the law of cosines: a squared = b squared + c squared - 2bc (cos A) If you have one angle and the 2 included sides, use the law of cosines as well. if you have an angle and the length of its opposite side, and the side opposite to the angle you want, then use the law of sines: sin A/ a = sin B/ b if you have the angle and the length of its opposite side and another angle, use the law of sines to figure out the unwanted angle anyway and then follow situation 1.


How can you know the last side of a triangle if you know the first two sides?

if it is a right triangle, use pythagorean theorem: a2+b2=c2 if not, and you have one of the angles, use law of sines: sinA/a=sinB/b=sinC/c


What situation would you be FORCED to use law of cosines as opposed to law of sines?

When none of the angles are known, and using Pythagoras, the triangle is known not to be right angled.

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