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Yes, but only when the inequality is not a strict inequality: thatis to say it is a "less than or equal to" or "more than or equal to" inequality. In such cases, the solution to the "or equal to" aspect will satisfy the corresponding inequality.

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Q: Is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution for both the equation and the inequality?
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If you replace the equal sign of an equation an put an inequality sign in its place is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution to both the equation and inequality?

Yes, when the inequality has a less that or equal to sign, or a greater than sign or equal to sign, then the equal sign can be replaced and get a solution that is common to both the equation and the inequality. There can also be other solutions to the inequality, where as the solution for the equation will be a valid one.


If you replace the equal sign of an equation and put an inequality sign in its place is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution to both the equation and inequality?

No - It will lead to a contradiction. No - It will lead to a contradiction.


If you replace the equal sign of equation with inequality sign is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution to both the equation and the inequality?

No. You have written two quantities. They can't be equal to each other AND also UNequal to each other.


Is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution for both an equation and an inequality?

See this example: x + 2 ≥ 4 x + 2 - 2 ≥ 4 - 2 x ≥ 2


How does solving linear inequality differ from solving linear equation?

Linear inequalities are equations, but instead of an equal sign, it has either a greater than, greater than or equal to, less than, or a less than or equal to sign. Both can be graphed. Solving linear equations mainly differs from solving linear inequalities in the form of the solution. 1. Linear equation. For each linear equation in x, there is only one value of x (solution) that makes the equation true. The equation: x - 3 = 7 has one solution, that is x = 10. The equation: 3x + 4 = 13 has one solution that is x = 3. 2. Linear inequality. On the contrary, a linear inequality has an infinity of solutions, meaning there is an infinity of value of x that make the inequality true. All these x values constitute the "solution set" of the inequality. The answers of a linear inequality are expressed in the form of intervals. The linear inequality x + 5 < 9 has as solution: x < 4. The solution set of this inequality is the interval (-infinity, 4) The inequality 4x - 3 > 5 has as solution x > 2. The solution set is the interval (2, +infinity). The intervals can be open, closed, and half closed. The open interval (1, 4) ; the 2 endpoints 1 and 4 are not included in the solution set. The closed interval [-2, 5] ; the 2 end points -2 and 5 are included. The half-closed interval [3, +infinity) ; the end point 3 is included.


When solving an inequality when do you reverse the inequality sign?

When you divide both sides by a negative value


Which will solve N in 8xN plus 40 equals?

Nothing will solve an expression. You need an equation (an equality or an inequality) beofre a solution of any kind is possible. Tha means you need something on both sides of the equality (or inequality) sign.


What does an equation and an inequality have in common?

They both have variables. They both have addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.


How do you solve inequality 8x 16?

To solve the inequality of 8x = 16 use simple algebra to isolate x. Divide both sides of the equation by 8. You will then be left with the equation x = 2, which is our answer.


How do you determine whether a number is a solution of an equation?

Substitute the value found back into the equation, evaluate the expressions and see if the resulting equation is true.


Is it an inequality if a new and equivalent inequality can be created by changing the signs of both terms and reversing the sense?

It is still an inequality but not a new inequality. It will not alter the existence or non-existence of a solution to a system of linear equations / inequalities.


How does solving linear inequalities differ from solving linear equations?

Linear inequalities are equations, but instead of an equal sign, it has either a greater than, greater than or equal to, less than, or a less than or equal to sign. Both can be graphed. Solving linear equations mainly differs from solving linear inequalities in the form of the solution. 1. Linear equation. For each linear equation in x, there is only one value of x (solution) that makes the equation true. Example 1. The equation: x - 3 = 7 has one solution, that is x = 10. Example 2. The equation: 3x + 4 = 13 has one solution that is x = 3. 2. Linear inequality. On the contrary, a linear inequality has an infinity of solutions, meaning there is an infinity of values of x that make the inequality true. All these x values constitute the "solution set" of the inequality. The answers of a linear inequality are expressed in the form of intervals. Example 3. The linear inequality x + 5 < 9 has as solution: x < 4. The solution set of this inequality is the interval (-infinity, 4) Example 4. The inequality 4x - 3 > 5 has as solution x > 2. The solution set is the interval (2, +infinity). The intervals can be open, closed, and half closed. Example: The open interval (1, 4) ; the 2 endpoints 1 and 4 are not included in the solution set. Example: The closed interval [-2, 5] ; the 2 end points -2 and 5 are included. Example : The half-closed interval [3, +infinity) ; the end point 3 is included.


How do you know when an equation has no solution?

By solving the equation. If you get some contradictory equation, the original equation has no solution, assuming you did everything correctly. For example, if you solve:x + 3 = x + 2 by subtracting x on both sides, you get: 3 = 2 which is always false (regardless of the value of "x").


When you divide both sides of an inequality by a positive value you must change the direction of the inequality sign?

No. Only when you divide by a negative.


How can you solve an equation or inequality in one variable?

The answer depends on the form of the equation and the domain.For example,there is no solution for x + 2 = 0 if the domain is positive integers, but there is if x can be a negative integer.there is no solution for 2x = 1 for integer x but there is if x can be a rational number.there is no solution for x^2 = 2 for rational x but there is if x can be an irrational number.there is no real solution for x^2 = -2 for real x there is if x can be a complex number.There are many other equations in one variable for which cannot be solved.However, for simple equations, you may get a solution by making the same changes to both sides of the equation (with some exceptions, like division by zero, or taking square roots, etc) until you rename one side as the variable.For example, to solve(2x + 3)/5 = 9Multiply both sides by 5: 2x + 3 = 45Subtract 3 from both sides: 2x = 42Divide both sides by 2: x = 21.Solution of inequalities is the same except that if you multiply or divide by a negative number then the inequality changes direction.


What do you call the solution of a equation derived from an original equation that is not a solution of the original equation?

That's an extraneous solution. You need to check for these when algebraically solving equations, especially when you take both sides of an equation to a power.


How many solution sets do systems of linear inequalities have Must solutions to systems of linear inequalities satisfy both inequalities In what case might they not?

A solution to a linear inequality in two variables is an ordered pair (x, y) that makes the inequality a true statement. The solution set is the set of all solutions to the inequality. The solution set to an inequality in two variables is typically a region in the xy-plane, which means that there are infinitely many solutions. Sometimes a solution set must satisfy two inequalities in a system of linear inequalities in two variables. If it does not satisfy both inequalities then it is not a solution.


What is a mathematical sentence that compares expressions that are equal?

If both sides are equal, it's called an equation. If both sides are NOT equal, it's called an inequality.


Can you give me 10 word problems with solution using quadratic equation?

What the value of x when x2 = 121 Solution: square root both sides which will give x a value of 11 So: x = 11


When a quantity is added to or subtracted from both sides of an inequality the resulting inequality will have the same direction as the original one?

When a quantity is subtracted or added from both sides of an inequality, the true difference in value is varied thereby changing the direction of the inequality, but when rather than subtracted or added it is multiplied or divided, it preserves the true difference in value thereby facing the same direction as the initial inequality.


How can you solve this inequality 5-3x equals 17?

5 - 3x = 17 is not an inequality, it is an equation. Inequalities never have equal signs in them, only "less/greater than", and "less/greater than or equal to" signs.To solve the equation:Step 1: Add 3x to both sides: 5 = 17 + 3xStep 2: Subtract 17 from both sides: -12 = 3xStep 3: Divide both sides by 3: x = -4The solution to the equation is x = -4


What i the solution to this inequality x- 25 is less than or equal to 33?

Just add 25 to both sides of the inequality - that way, you will isolate the "x", i.e., solve for "x".


What are the steps to solving a radical equation?

Details may vary depending on the equation. Quite often, you have to square both sides of the equation, to get rid of the radical sign. It may be necessary to rearrange the equation before doing this, after doing this, or both. Squaring both sides of the equation may introduce "extraneous" roots (solutions), that is, solutions that are not part of the original equation, so you have to check each solution of the second equation, to see whether it is also a solution of the first equation.


Why is it important to keep both sides of the equation equal?

If both sides of an equation are not equal, it won't be an equation any more! In solving equations, the strategy is to change both sides in the same way, so that an 'equivalent' equation is produced. An equivalent equation has the same solution as the original equation. You are aiming for an equation in which the variable is alone on one side. The quantity on the other side is the solution.


How is inequality differant from equation?

The difference is that instead of the sign "=", an inequality sign, for example "<" (less-than) is used. For solving inequalities, you can add, subtract, multiply or divide both sides by the same number, similar to an equation; however, if you multiply or divide by a negative number, the direction of the inequality changes. For example, "<" becomes ">".