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Answered 2013-03-07 20:42:26

A polynomial can have as many 0s as its order - the power of the highest term.

A polynomial can have as many 0s as its order - the power of the highest term.

A polynomial can have as many 0s as its order - the power of the highest term.

A polynomial can have as many 0s as its order - the power of the highest term.

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Answered 2013-03-07 20:42:26

A polynomial can have as many 0s as its order - the power of the highest term.

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Whats the maximum number of zeros in a number?

it is infinite. the most zeros in a number that we know today would have to be a hundred zeros. that number is called a google.


Why might it be useful to know the linear factors of a polynomial function?

It is useful to know the linear factors of a polynomial because they give you the zeros of the polynomial. If (x-c) is one of the linear factors of a polynomial, then p(c)=0. Here the notation p(x) is used to denoted a polynomial function at p(c) means the value of that function when evaluated at c. Conversely, if d is a zero of the polynomial, then (x-d) is a factor.


How do you know if a polynomial is in factored form?

You can't know if a general polynomial is in factored form.


How do you know if a number is divisble by 100?

It ends in two zeros.


How many zeros on the number Google?

There are a Hundred zeros!!!!! I know! Its totally CRAZY! Googol represent a number with 100 zeros: 1 googol = 1.0 × 10^100 Google is believed to be derived from this number, along with the term Googolplex.


How do you polynomial whose zeros are given?

If a polynomial p(x), has zeros at z1, z2, z3, ... then p(x) is a multiple of (x - z1)*(x - z2)*(x - z3)... To get the exact form of p(x) you also need to know the order of each root. If zk has order n then the relevant factor in p(x) is (x - zk)n


How can you know that a term is polynomial?

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How do you know that 81.9 81.90 81.900 are the same number?

Because they just have zeros after them.


What is the highest known number?

The highest named number is the Googolplexian: A "1" followed by a googolplex of zeros. To understand this magnitude you need to know that a Googolplex is a "1" followed by a googol of zeros, and that at a Googol is a "1" followed by one hundred zeros. The highest number which is not defined as to magnitude is infinity.


How do you solve this equation Form a polynomial with the given zeros 2 mult 2 3 5 I don't want the answer I want to know how to find the answer?

If you have the zeros of a polynomial, it is easy, almost trivial, to find an expression with those zeros. I am not sure I understood the question correctly, but let's assume you have the zero 2 with multiplicity 2, and other zeros at 3 and 5. Just write the expression: (x-2)(x-2)(x-3)(x-5). (Example with a negative zero: if there is a zero at "-5", the factor becomes (x- -5) = (x + 5).) You can multiply this out to get the polynomial if you like. For example, if you multiply every term in the first factor with every term in the second factor, you get x2 -2x -2x + 4 = x2 -4x + 4. Next, multiply each term of this polynomial with each term of the next factor, etc.


What does product of any whole number factor multiplied by 100 always have?

50


How many 0s are in the biggest number ever?

The centillion is the largest non-abstract number recognized by mathematicians. It has 303 zeros in America and 600 in Great Britain.


How do you know if you have simplified a polynomial correctly?

I suppose you mean factoring the polynomial. You can check by multiplying the factors - the result should be the original polynomial.


How do you know if a polynomial is prime?

no one will ever know ):<


What is the name of the highest number named?

The largest number known so far is called Grahams number. I don't know exactly how big it is, I just know it's bigger than a googleplex. A "google" is a 1 followed by 100 zeros, and a googleplex is a 1 followed by a google of zeros.


Is gazillion a real number?

No just a fictitious number made up to represent any huge number some try to argue this fact but they are most certainly wrong Just so you know, here's the list of "named illions": Billion has 9 zeros Trillion has 12 zeros Quadrillion has 15 zeros Quintillion has 18 zeros Sextillion has 21 zeros Septillion has 24 zeros Octillion has 27 zeros Nonillion has 30 zeros Decillion has 33 zeros Undecillion has 36 zeros Duodecillion has 39 zeros Tredecillion has 42 zeros Quattuordecillion has 45 zeros Quindecillion has 48 zeros Sexdecillion has 51 zeros Septendecillion has 54 zeros Octodecillion has 57 zeros Novemdecillion has 60 zeros Vigintillion has 63 zeros Googol has 100 zeros. Centillion has 303 zeros (except in Britain, where it has 600 zeros) Googolplex has a googol of zeros the original answer was wrong From Gazzen, from Latin "earthly edge", or end of the earth, abbreviated to gaz (literally 28810 ancient Greek miles, been one full revolution of the globe) So how much is a Gazillion? a Gazillion has (28810 x 3) zeros thus a Gazillion has 86430 zeros


How many zeros does a googolplez have?

A googolplex has a googol zeros. Don't know about a googolplez.


What is a number that starts with letter G followed by 100 zeros?

Googol! Not Google, googol! Did you know: That Google got it's name from this number?


Is it possible to get more than one output number for an input number How do you know?

Yes it is possible


What is the number 100000000000000000000000000000000000000000?

There are 41 zeros, so it is 10^41 or 1.0 E+41 I do not know of a name for this


How do you determine the zeros of a polynomial function?

In the general case, this is quite tricky. In high school, you learn some simple cases. If the polynomial is of degree 2, you can use the quadratic function. For higher degrees, in some specific cases you can use the methods taught in high school to factor the polynomial. As you might know, once the polynomial is completely factored, it is quite trivial to find the zeros. But in the general case, you need some iterative method, which is more appropriate for a computer. From Wikipedia, article "Polynomial": "Numerical approximations of roots of polynomial equations in one unknown is easily done on a computer by the Jenkins-Traub method, Laguerre's method, Durand-Kerner method or by some other root-finding algorithm." You can read about any of these methods for more information; but don't expect a formula where you just "plug in some numbers"; rather, those are iterative methods, that is, you need to repeat a certain calculation over and over until you get a root of a polynomial with the desired accuracy.


What is after a quadrillion?

Billion has 9 zeros Trillion has 12 zeros Quadrillion has 15 zeros Quintillion has 18 zeros Sextillion has 21 zeros Septillion has 24 zeros Octillion has 27 zeros Nonillion has 30 zeros Decillion has 33 zeros Undecillion has 36 zeros Duodecillion has 39 zeros Tredecillion has 42 zeros Quattuordecillion has 45 zeros Quindecillion has 48 zeros Sexdecillion has 51 zeros Septendecillion has 54 zeros Octodecillion has 57 zeros Novemdecillion has 60 zeros Vigintillion has 63 zeros Googol has 100 zeros. Centillion has 303 zeros (except in Britain, where it has 600 zeros) Googolplex has a googol of zeros


If a polynomial cannot be written as the product of two other polynomials excluding 1 and negative 1 then the polynomial is said to be?

irreducible polynomial prime...i know its the same as irreducible but on mymathlab you would select prime


How do you find the neutrons when you know the atominc number?

It is not possible.


What is an algebraic expression of a polynomial term?

A polynomial term must have only a positive integer exponent for its variable(s). As we know a term is a number or a multiplication of a number and one or more variables associated by their exponents. Examples of terms: 2, -x, 3x2y, √5x5y-9z3w, 8x-7, 3/5, x2/3/y ect. Examples of polynomial terms: -10, -15z, √2x3y2z, 3x2y, ect.