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What is the 14th term in the arithmetic sequence in which the first is 100 and the common difference is -4?

a14= a + 13d

= 100 + 13(-4)

= 48

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โˆ™ 2011-03-10 15:12:55
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Q: What is the 14th term in an arithmetic sequence in which the first term is 100 and the common difference is -4?
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