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The High Standard Sentinel Deluxe R-107 was made in the late 1960's to the early 1970's with a short run time. The value range currently is $25 to $200 due to various models. The 4" single action on the low side and the 6" double action with .22lr and .22Magnum interchangable cylinders on the high side. There are several sites on the web offering parts and breakdown sketches. In late 2007 at a Christy's auction house, a 6" barreled double action R-107 was auctioned off for $180.

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Q: What is the value of a Sentinel Deluxe 22 Model R107?
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Condensed DATA on British Army Wireless Sets of the numerical period.Click to the set number e.g. Wireless Set No. 19 to see the photograph. More photographs will be added constantly, the final object will be that a picture is available for each Wireless Set listed below. Note that the quality of some pictures is not optimal. When available, better quality photos shall be posted, this will take some time as I have to visit friends and musea to take these pictures. Ultimately more pages might be added with pictures of the interior and accessories, which were either not listed or not being available when both Volume 1 and 2 were printed. For an overview of most of the pictures in this page see also the Army Wireless Sets Image Directory section.Wireless Set No. 1 was a portable transmitter/receiver, developed in 1933. Use: short range Infantry Brigade, Division and RA Regiment communication. Frequency range 4.2-6.6MHz. MO control. RF output 0.5W. R/T and CW. Range up to 5 miles. 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Use: Infantry Brigade and RA Regiment communication but later also employed as general purpose ground and vehicle station. Frequency range 4.2-7.5MHz and 19-31MHz. MO control. RF output 0.8-1.5W. R/T, MCW, CW. Range up to 5 miles. Replacing No. 11 Set LP. High band (19-31MHz) hardly used in practice. See also the inside and the transmittersection close up.Wireless Set No. 22 was a portable transceiver developed in 1942. Use: general purpose low power vehicle and ground station with facilities for man pack. Frequency range 2-8MHz. MO control. RF output 1.5W. R/T, CW. Range up to 20 miles. General appearance resemble No. 19 Set. Standard WW2 set. See also the inside.Wireless Set No. 23 was a mobile transmitter developed in 1940. Use: Army Corps and Division communication and later general purpose long-range set. Frequency range 1.12-13.55MHz. MO control. RF output 250W. R/T, MCW, CW. Range 1000 miles. Alternative of No. 3 Set. Limited issue only superseded by No. 33 and 12HP Set. 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Use: general purpose Infantry short range communication in forward areas between Company and Battalion HQs. Frequency range 6-9MHz. R/T and CW. MO control. RF output 0.25W. Range 3-5 miles. Limited number produced as an alternative to No. 18 Set.Wireless Set No. 29 was a mobile transceiver developed in about 1945. Use: AFV, tank, truck and ground station. Frequency range 'A' set 2-8MHz; 'B' set 235 and 245 MHz. MO control. RF output 'A' set 25W; 'B' set 1W. R/T, MCW and CW. Range up to 25 miles; 'B' set 3/4 mile. Set was developed in Canada as a replacement of No. 19 Set. Limited number produced. Abandoned.Wireless Set No. 31 was a man pack transceiver developed in 1948. Use: short range communication in Infantry Company and Battalion HQ. Frequency range 40-48MHz. MO control. RF output 0.3W. FM R/T only. Range up to 5 miles. Similar to US Signal Corps SCR-300 (BC-1000) with minor modifications.Wireless Set No. 31AFV was an AFV transceiver. Use: short range communication to Infantry equipped with Wireless Sets No.31 and 88. Frequency range 40-48MHz. MO control. RF output 0.3W. FM R/T only. Range up to 5 miles. The set is basically a modified No.31 Set with a separate 12/24V power pack connected to the vehicle's wireless harnessWireless Set No. 32 was a mobile transceiver developed in about 1944. Use: experimental set to obtain comparisons between AM and FM communications. Frequency range 2-8MHz. MO control. RF output 10 W. R/T (AM and FM) and CW. Range up to 20 miles. Set resembles No. 19 Set and No. 22 Set. Limited production.Wireless Set No. 33 was a mobile transmitter developed in 1941. Use: Line of Communication and general purpose medium-power transmitter, used in a mobile station or ground station. Frequency range 1.2-17.5MHz. MO control. RF output 250W. R/T, MCW and CW. Range up to 80 miles. Set is principally a No. 12 Set with RF power amplifier added. Receiver normally associated is Reception Set R107.Wireless Set No. 36 was a portable transmitter developed in 1941. Use: anti-Aircraft defence gun control communication. Frequency range 10-60MHz. MO or crystal control. RF output 25W. R/T, MCW and CW. Range up to 25 miles. Associated receiver Reception Set R208.Wireless Set No. 37 was a man pack transceiver developed in 1941. Use: short range communication for paratroops. Frequency range 340-385MHz. Super regenerative. RF output 0.5W. R/T and MCW. Range (ground) 1 mile; (ground/air) up to 15 miles. Limited production.Wireless Set No. 38 Mk.II was a man pack transceiver developed in 1942. Use: short range Infantry communication. Frequency range 7.4-9.2MHz. MO control. RF output 0.2W. R/T only. Range: up to 1 mile using long 12ft rod. This set has unique design features using only 5 valves. Standard WW2 set. See also the inside and accessories posted in the gallery.Wireless Set No. 38 AFV was an AFV transceiver developed in 1944. Use: short range communication to Infantry equipped with Wireless Sets No. 38. Frequency range 7.4-9.2MHz. MO control. RF output 0.2W. R/T only. Range: up to 1 mile using long 12ft rod. Principally a MK.II version with a 12V DC supply unit and facilities for control by tank crew.Wireless Set No. 38 Mk.III was a man pack transceiver developed in 1944/5. Use: short range Infantry communication. Frequency range 7.4-9.2MHz. MO control. RF output 0.2W. R/T only. Range: up to 1 mile using long 12ft rod. Basically a tropicalised hermetically sealed version of the Mk.II model.Wireless Set No. 42 was a portable transceiver developed in about 1945. Use: general purpose vehicle/animal pack and man pack station. Frequency range 1.6-12.8MHz. MO control. RF output 10W. R/T (AM and FM) and CW. Range up to 25 miles. Limited trial production. Abandoned.Wireless Set No. 43 was a mobile/fixed transmitter developed in 1943. Use: general purpose high power transmitter for mobile or static operation. Frequency range 2-12MHz. MO/crystal control. RF output up to 400W. Range up to 75 miles as mobile station. Canadian development.Wireless Set No. 46 was a man pack transceiver developed in 1942. Use: principally airborne and sea assault (Commando) troops. Frequency Range 3-9.1 MHz. Crystal control. R/T or MCW. Range: up to 10 miles using long type rod. The first full waterproof man pack set. See also the inside and the underside. Accessories are posted in the Gallery.Wireless Set No. 47 was an experimental semi-portable transmitter receiver developed in 1940. Use: experimental duplex point to point duplex radio link. Frequency 500-550MHz. RF output 5W. MO control. R/T and MCW. Range up to 15 miles line of sight. Abandoned.Wireless Set No. 48 was a man pack transmitter receiver developed in about 1942. Use: short range communication in forward areas within Infantry battalions and RA regiments. Frequency Range 6-9MHz. RF output 0.25W. R/T and CW. MO control. Range up to 10 miles. USA development as an alternative to No. 18 Set. See also the transmitter inside and the receiver inside.Wireless Set No. 49A was a mobile transceiver developed in about 1948. Use: AFV and general purpose communication. Intended as a replacement of No. 19 Set. Frequency range 'A' set 25-38MHz; 'B' set 38-42MHz. RF output 15W; 0.4W. FM R/T. Crystal control. Range 10 miles 'A' set; 4 miles 'B' set. Set comprises two units: WS No. 49A (later C40) and WS No. 49B (later B40). Hermetically sealed. Abandoned and replaced by C42/45 and B47/48.Wireless Set No. 52 was a mobile transmitter receiver developed in 1943. Use: general purpose Brigade to Division communication, principally used as a vehicle or ground station. Frequency range 1.75-16MHz. RF output up to 100W. MO control. R/T, MCW and CW. Range up to 100 miles. Canadian design replacing No. 9 Set. Very successful design.Wireless Set No. 53 was a mobile transmitter developed in about 1944. Use: medium power transmitter primarily for semi-mobile installations such as Armoured Command Vehicles but also used as a ground station. Frequency range 1.2-17.5MHz. RF output 250W. MO and crystal control. R/T, MCW and CW. Range up to 500 miles. Associated receiver is Reception Set R107. Replacement for No. 12HP and No. 33 Set.Wireless Set No. 56 was a mobile transmitter developed in about 1944. Use: high powered jammer and Army chain transmitter. Frequency range 200kHz to 20MHz. RF output up to 12kW. MO control. R/T and various other modulation systems. Communication range world wide. Design abandoned.Wireless Set No. 57 was a mobile transmitter receiver developed in about 1943. Use: auxiliary point to point full duplex service link in No. 26 Set station. Frequency range 85-95MHz. RF output 10W. Crystal control. R/T only. Range up to 60 miles optical range.Wireless Set Cdn No. 58 was a man pack transceiver developed in 1943. Use: short range communication in Infantry Battalion. Frequency range 6-9MHz. RF output 0.3W. MO control. R/T only. Range up to 5 miles. Canadian design as a replacement of No. 18 Set.Wireless Set No. 62 was a portable/mobile transceiver developed in about 1945. Use: general purpose for vehicle and ground station, but suitable as a man pack and animal pack. Frequency range 1.6-12MHz. RF output 1W. MO and crystal control. R/T and CW. Range up to 25 miles. Replacement for No. 22 Set. Accessories and inside view are posted in the Gallery.Wireless Set No. 63 was a transportable transmitter receiver station developed in about 1945. Use: Line of Communication static radio station providing two-way teleprinter operation. Frequency range 3-20MHz. RF output 1kW. MO and crystal control. Tone frequency keying. Range up to 1000 miles. Built into trailer or shelter.Wireless Set No. 68 was a man pack transmitter/receiver developed in 1943. Use: short range communication in forward areas between Battalion HQ and Company HQ. Frequency range 1.75-2.9MHz (WS 68P); 3-5.2MHz (WS 68R and T). MO and crystal control. RF output 0.25W. R/T, CW. Range up to 10 miles. Set is similar to No. 18 Set but with different frequency range.Wireless Set No. 76 was a portable transmitter developed in 1943. Use: light-weight self contained transmitter for rear link communication. Frequency range 2-12MHz. RF output 9W. Crystal control. CW only.Range over 300 miles. Normally used with Reception Set R109. See also the inside.Wireless Set No. 78 was a man pack transceiver developed in about 1945. Use: short range Infantry communication. Frequency range 2.960-9.515MHz. RF output 0.4W. Crystal control. R/T only. Range 3 miles. Limited production. Abandoned.Wireless Set No. 86 was a mobile multi-channel radio link developed in about 1948. Use: vehicular mounted radio relay for communication between Division and Corps. Frequency range 50-100MHz. RF output up to 36W. Crystal control. FM R/T. Range 30 miles optical. Renamed into C41/R222.Wireless Set No. 88 was a man pack transceiver developed in about 1947. Use: short range Infantry Company/Platoon communication. Frequency range 38.01-42.15MHz. RF output 0.25W. Crystal control. FM R/T. Range up to 2 miles. Replacement of No. 38 Set.Wireless Set No. 88 AFV was an AFV version of the No. 88 Set, normally used with Wireless Set No. 19. Frequency range 38.01-42.15MHz. RF output 0.25W. Crystal control. FM R/T. Range up to 2 miles. Replacement of Wireless Set No. 38 AFV.Extensive technical details, comprehensive development history, circuit diagrams, alignment procedures, accessories lists, literature and references, vehicle installation drawings and many, many pictures can be found in "Wireless for the Warrior"Volume 1 and Volume 2.