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13 f m in a y?

Updated: 12/12/2022
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How do you solve 2x y 4?

Solve for y: f(-5)=13+2x


What is the slope of y equals -13?

0A line with the equation y = -13 is a horizontal line. The slope is zero.If you think of the "y = mx + b" form of a straight line, the 'b' must be -13, and the 'm' must be zero since there is no x term. 'm' is the slope, so the slope is 0.


What linear function gives you f(0) 1 and f(1) 4?

Consider it as a graph with points (x, f(x)): you have two points (0, 1) and (1, 4) joined by a line (as it is a linear function). The slope m = change in y/change in x = (4-1)/(1-0) = 3 Using y - Yo = m(y - Xo) y - 1 = 3(x - 0) → y = 3x + 1 → f(x) = 3x + 1


What it means to solve a linear equation of one variable?

It means the equation has the form y=mx+b where m and b are constants and y=f(x). This would be as opposed to something like z=ny+mx+b where n,m and b are constants and z=f(x,y). In that case the function is dependent on two variables, x and y, instead of one.


What is the vertex to -5x2 plus 20x-13?

-5x2 + 20x - 13 describes a parabola, and you can find it's vertex in various ways. To find it using calculus, you can simply take it's derivative and solve for 0: f(x) = -5x2 + 20x - 13 f'(x) = -10x + 20 Let f'(x) = 0, then: 0 = -10x + 20 x = 2 Then simply plug the x value into the original equation: f(x) = -5 * 22 + 20 * 2 - 13 = -20 + 40 - 13 = 7 So the vertex of this parabola is at the point (2, 7). To solve it using strictly algebra, you can do it by expressing it as a value of y, and then rearranging accordingly: y = -5x2 + 20x - 13 y = -5(x2 - 4x) - 13 y = -5(x2 - 4x + 4 - 4) - 13 y = -5(x2 - 4x + 4) + 20 - 13 y = -5(x - 2)2 + 7 From which we can see that the vertex happens at the point (2, 7)