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No, in any distribution panel there are individual bars for each termination. The ground buss is in direct contact with the metal enclosure. The neutral is isolated from the metal enclosure. The only place where the two come into contact with each other is where a bonding screw protrudes through the neutral bar and into the metal enclosure.

No, most panels have the option of bonding the neutral as well as the ground bar and the panel enclosure (bonding screw) The bonding screw should never be the only connection to the neutral. The NEC requires that the ground bar be connected to the neutral only at the first panel where utility power is supplied. Every other sub panel downstream must have the neutral and ground separated and the ground bar should always have the bonding screw connecting the enclosure to its respective ground bar. So if the panel is a sub panel, ground and neutral must be separated. The main panel does not. There are other grounding rules related to water pipes and other utilities as well as where the ground rods are driven and bonded. Be sure you understand the rules before attempting a wiring change.

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โˆ™ 2010-02-21 16:23:52
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Q: Do you need to replace a panel that has a bar connecting the ground and neutral bus bar?
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What will happen if neutral and ground wire is shorted?

Nothing will happen if the neutral and ground wire is shorted. The electrical code makes it mandatory that the neutral and ground are brought together at a common point within the distribution panel. On a 120/240 volt distribution system the ground wire is terminated at the point where the service neutral terminated in the distribution panel. It is usually a double lug the neutral wire connecting into one hole and the ground wire connecting into the other hole. Through this lug assembly there is a machine screw that is inserted through the lug assembly and it screws into the metallic enclosure of the distribution panel. This action bonds the metal enclosure, neutral wire and ground wire bringing the point to a common potential of zero.


Should you hook your neutral to ground?

Neutral is connected to ground at the distribution panel, and no where else. Any current flowing on ground downstream of the panel is considered a ground fault.


Why does your panel have a neutral but no ground?

Just checked and it does have a ground connection.


How do you connect a 240 volt ground?

On a 120/240 volt distribution system the ground wire is terminated at the point where the service neutral terminated in the distribution panel. It is usually a double lug the neutral wire connecting into one hole and the ground wire connecting into the other hole. Through this lug assembly there is a machine screw that is inserted through the lug assembly and it screws into the metallic enclosure of the distribution panel. This action bonds the metal enclosure, neutral wire and ground wire bringing the point to a common potential of zero.


Are the neutral and ground bonded in a sub-panel of an out building?

The neutral and ground are only bonded in a sub-panel of an out building if the code requires a buried ground rod or plate at this location.


Why do some electric panel have ground and neutral bonded together?

By National Electric Code only the Main Panel should bond ground and neutral. If subpanels have ground and neutral bonded, it could cause ground loops and shock hazards.


Can ground and neutral wires go to same busbar in panel?

in a sub panel no in a main panel they can


Is the neutral bus bonded to the equipment ground in a subpanel?

Neutral and ground are only bonded at the main panel, not subpanel.


When is the neutral grounded in an electrical circuit?

The Neutral is bonded to the ground at the FIRST main breaker, which is usually just as it comes from the meter. In normal residential applications, power comes from the meter, then to a panel. In that panel, the ground and neutral are bonded. If that panel feeds another panel, the second panel has to have its ground and neutral separated. Mobile homes have to have a main breaker outside the house, so the neutral is grounded there, and inside the mobile home, they are separated.


Why isn't the ground wire bonded to the neutral wire in a sub panel?

Answer for USA, Canada and countries running a 60 Hertz supply service.The ground wire is not bonded to the neutral wire in a sub panel because the sub panel is considered to be a branch circuit from the main panel. Only the main panel is grounded at the neutral. Any faults at the sub panel would return direct to the main panel through the ground wire in the cable feeding the sub panel. If the sub panel was located in another building separate from the building where the main panel is located then a bond to the neutral would be made and also to the ground rod that would be needed for this installation. Another consideration is that the grounding system is designed to carry zero current in normal operation. If the neutral and ground wire were bonded at a sub panel, return current from the sub panel to the main panel would be split between the neutral and ground, even if there are no faults. Separating the neutral and ground ensures that there is no path for return current to flow in the protective ground.


What happens if you splice ground wire and neutral wire in a high hat fixture?

Ground and neutral are kept separate for a reason. They are only "bonded" at the main panel. The reason is that you can create what are called ground loops where current can flow. This is because all wires have some resistance and by connecting neutral and ground you open yourself to these ground loops which can cause shocks or can adversely affect electronic equipment.


Can the neutral and the ground be connected to the same terminal on a service panel bus?

In North America the ground and neutral only come together on the main neutral bus. On a combination panel this bus is in the main breaker compartment of the panel. Also this is where the panel enclosure is bonded to the neutral and ground wire through a bolt that passes through the neutral bus and screws into the panels enclosure. On sub panels from the main panel this bonding bolt has to be removed.

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