answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

experimental probability

User Avatar

Wiki User

βˆ™ 2011-04-10 23:28:44
This answer is:
User Avatar
Study guides

Algebra

20 cards

A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

➑️
See all cards
3.8
β˜†β˜…β˜†β˜…β˜†β˜…β˜†β˜…β˜†β˜…
1474 Reviews

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: What is more valid theoretical or experimental probability?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Related questions

What is the difference between theoretical and experimental probability?

The difference between theoretical probability and experimental probability is that theoretical probability is more of a CHANCE, and experimental probability is when you actually TEST it.


How many times would a coin have to show heads in 50 tosses to show an experimental probability of 20 percent more than the theoretical probability of getting heads?

Theoretical probability = 0.5 Experimental probability = 20% more = 0.6 In 50 tosses, that would imply 30 heads.


How do you do you increase accuracy in a theoritcal or experimental probability?

You improve your model through a better understanding of the underlying processes. Although more trials will improve the accuracy of experimental probability they will make no difference to the theoretical probability.


What are the types of probability?

They are generally agreed to be theoretical and experimental probabilities. Probability is probability. The concept may be applied to any causal event which has more than one potential outcome.


What are theoretical and expierimental probability?

Theoretical probability is the probability of something occurring when the math is done out on paper or 'in theory' such as the chance of rolling a six sided dice and getting a 2 is 1/6. Experimental probability is what actually occurs during an experiment trying to determine the probability of something. If a six sided dice is rolled ten times and the results are as follows 5,2,6,2,5,3,1,4,6,1 then the probability of rolling a 2 is 1/3. The law of large numbers states the more a probability experiment is preformed the closer to the theoretical probability the results will be.


What is the experimental probability of head and one tails appearing 106 times?

You can find a 'theoretical probability' or a 'mathematical probability' witha pencil and paper. But the only way to find an experimental probabilityis to do the experiment.(Also, before you do the experiment, you really need to define the 'successfuloutcome' a little more clearly. Like, what does "head and one tails" mean, howmany coins are being flipped for each trial, and how many trials will there be ? )


What is the theoretical probability of choosing a red and blue marble on a turn?

cant answer this question without more information....probability requires a ratio.


How would you compare theoretical probability and experimental probability for getting three heads to the theoretical probability. would you expect the probabilities to be equal .?

I'm going to assume you're looking for the probability of getting three heads out of three coin spins and that you're using a fair coin. For coin spins, theoretical probability is very simple. The probability of getting three heads in a row is 1/2 * 1/2 * 1/2 = 1/8. This means that if you tossed a coin three times, you'd expect to see three heads once every 8 trials. For experimental probability you need to define clear trials, for this experiment you can't just spin a coin over and over and count the number of times you see three heads in a row, for example, if you threw the following: H T H H T T H H H H H T T H T T T you have three cases where you have three heads in a row, but they all overlap so these are not independent trials and cannot be compared to the theoretical result. When conducting your experiment, you know that if you get a T in your trial, it doesn't matter what comes after, that trial has already failed to get three heads in a row. The trial is deemed a success if you get three heads in a row, naturally. As a result, if you threw the above sequence, you would to determine your experimental probability in the following way: H T fail H H T fail T fail H H H success H H T fail T fail H T fail T fail T fail In this example we have 8 trials and one success, therefore the experimental probability is 1/8. The sample variance (look it up), however is also 1/8, meaning that all you really know is that the experimental probability could be anywhere between 0 and 1/4. The only way to get the variance down (and therefore reduce your confidence interval) is to perform more and more trials. It's unlikely for the theoretical probability and experimental probability to be EXACTLY the same but the more trials you do, the more the experimental probability will converge on the theoretical probability.


What is theoretical probability and experimental probability?

They are just used to make equations and make more things like more equations and estimates!Theoretical Probability: P(event) the ratio of the number of favorable outcomes to the number of possible outcomes, written as a ratio.example: number of favorable outcomes over number of possible outcomesAmelynn is hungry, so she gets out a bowl and puts in 2 red jelly beans, 3 blue jelly beans, 12 pink jelly beans, and 3 yellow jelly beans. Amelynn likes the pink ones the best. What is the theoretical possibility of her getting a pink jelly bean?Answer: 12 over 20. (or 3 over 5 [simplest form])Explanation: Amelynn put 20 jelly beans in the bowl. She wants the pink ones, andthere are 12 pink jelly beans, which are the favorable outcomes. There are 20 jelly beans, and these are the possible outcomes. This means that it is 12 over 20. You might have to put this in simplest form as well. also this is 60% total.******************************************************************************************Experimental Probability: The number of times the outcome occurs compared to the total number of trials.example: number of favorable outcomes over total number of trials.Amelynn is flipping a coin. She finished the task one time, then did it again. Here are her results: heads: three times and tails: seven times. What is the experimental probability of the coin landing on heads?Answer: 3/10Explanation: Amelynn flipped the coin a total of 10 times, getting heads 3 times. Therefore, the answer is: 3/10 or 30%Theoretical probability ... a coin has 2 sides so the theoretical probability of flipping a coin and getting heads is 1/2.Experimental probability... flip a coin 10 time and you get 7 heads so the experimental probability of getting heads is 7/10


What is theoretically probability and experimental probability?

They are just used to make equations and make more things like more equations and estimates!Theoretical Probability: P(event) the ratio of the number of favorable outcomes to the number of possible outcomes, written as a ratio.example: number of favorable outcomes over number of possible outcomesAmelynn is hungry, so she gets out a bowl and puts in 2 red jelly beans, 3 blue jelly beans, 12 pink jelly beans, and 3 yellow jelly beans. Amelynn likes the pink ones the best. What is the theoretical possibility of her getting a pink jelly bean?Answer: 12 over 20. (or 3 over 5 [simplest form])Explanation: Amelynn put 20 jelly beans in the bowl. She wants the pink ones, andthere are 12 pink jelly beans, which are the favorable outcomes. There are 20 jelly beans, and these are the possible outcomes. This means that it is 12 over 20. You might have to put this in simplest form as well. also this is 60% total.******************************************************************************************Experimental Probability: The number of times the outcome occurs compared to the total number of trials.example: number of favorable outcomes over total number of trials.Amelynn is flipping a coin. She finished the task one time, then did it again. Here are her results: heads: three times and tails: seven times. What is the experimental probability of the coin landing on heads?Answer: 3/10Explanation: Amelynn flipped the coin a total of 10 times, getting heads 3 times. Therefore, the answer is: 3/10 or 30%Theoretical probability ... a coin has 2 sides so the theoretical probability of flipping a coin and getting heads is 1/2.Experimental probability... flip a coin 10 time and you get 7 heads so the experimental probability of getting heads is 7/10


What is his experimental probability of not getting a six?

Each series of experiments is likely to give a slightly different answers. You will need to conduct the experiment and countthe number of times you got a 6 (= n6); andthe total number of times the experiment was conducted (= N).Then, the required probability is (N - n6)/N. As you increase N, the experimental probability will become more accurate.


What if a potassium chlorate sample is contaminated with KCL would the experimental percent oxygen be higher or lower than the theoretical percent oxygen?

the experimental % oxygen would be lower because there would be more KCL in the simple than oxygen

People also asked