answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

∫ f'(x)/(p2 + q2f(x)2) dx = [1/(pq)]arctan(qf(x)/p)

User Avatar

Wiki User

โˆ™ 2010-11-05 10:29:04
This answer is:
User Avatar
Study guides

Algebra

20 cards

A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

โžก๏ธ
See all cards
3.81
โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…
1746 Reviews

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of f divided by the quantity p squared plus q squared f squared with respect to x where f is a function of x and p and q are constants?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Related questions

What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of f divided by the quantity q squared f squared minus p squared with respect to x where f is a function of x and p and q are constants?

∫ f'(x)/( q2f(x)2 - p2) dx = [1/(2pq)ln[(qf(x) - p)/(qf(x) + p)]


Equation for marginal cost and average cost?

Marginal cost - the derivative of the cost function with respect to quantity. Average cost - the cost function divided by quantity (q).


What are derivates?

The spacial derivative is the measure of a quantity as and how it is being changed in space. This is different from a temporal derivative and partial derivative.


What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of the function f divided by the square root of the quantity a times f plus b with respect to x?

∫ f'(x)/√(af(x) + b) dx = 2√(af(x) + b)/a + C C is the constant of integration.


What are spacial derivatives?

The spacial derivative is the measure of a quantity as and how it is being changed in space. This is different from a temporal derivative and partial derivative.


What is the difference between constants and variables?

A variable is a quantity which changes its value through out the program or its lifetime. But a constant is a quantity which does not change its value through out its life time. There are 5 basic constants.


How do you calculate unit cost as you increase production?

Increase in cost: take the first derivative with respect to the unit produced of a cost function. Total cost: sub-in the new quantity into the cost function.


What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of the function f divided by the square root of the quantity f squared plus a constant with respect to x?

∫ f'(x)/√[f(x)2 + a] dx = ln[f(x) + √(f(x)2 + a)] + C C is the constant of integration.


Marginal cost can be defined as the?

The cost of increasing the production by one unit. Mathematically, this can be derived as the derivative of the total costs with respect to quantity i.e. dc(q)/dq, where c(q) is the cost function and q is quantity.


What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of the function f multiplied by the quantity a times f plus b raised to the power of n with respect to x?

∫ f'(x)(af(x) + b)n dx = (af(x) + b)n + 1/[a(n + 1)] + C C is the constant of integration.


What is the integral of f prime divided by the quantity a times the square of f plus b times f with respect to x where f is a function of x and a and b are constants?

∫ f'(x)/(af(x)2 + bf) dx = (1/b)ln[f(x)/(af(x) + b)] + C C is the constant of integration.


Can a quantity have constant value and be dimensionless?

Yes. Conversion factors will generally be dimensionless constants.

People also asked