answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

It depends on a number of factors. The size of the service wires, the meter rating, the main breaker panel rating, etc. will have to be rated for the amperage you want to go up to.

User Avatar

Wiki User

โˆ™ 2005-03-16 04:01:30
This answer is:
User Avatar
Study guides

Physics

20 cards

What type of circuit in which all parts are connected in a single loop

What angle is between 90 and 180

What condition has symptoms that include ringing buzzing or roaring in the ears or head

What is the transfer of energy as electromagnetic waves called

โžก๏ธ
See all cards
3.83
โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…
24 Reviews

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: Can you upgrade a 100A main circuit breaker to a higher amp?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Continue Learning about Natural Sciences

Is the amperage of a breaker for total amps combined or on each leg?

The breaker will trip at the amperage notated on the breaker. If it's 100A...it will trip at or around 100A. It does not matter if that breaker is physically tied to another 100A breaker. To understand this, imagine that you remove the mechanical tie from the two-pole breaker. Now you just have two 100A breakers. In actuality, you always had two 100A breakers. The mechanical tie does not change that. If you then powered two, separate 120 volt devices from the two breakers, each breaker would allow 100 amperes to pass to each of the devices before tripping. So why are they tied together? That is done when the two-pole breaker is to be used to power a 240 volt circuit. In AC current, electricity flows in both directions. In a 120 volt circuit, it flows "out" toward the device via the hot (generally the black wire) and "back" via the neutral (generally the white wire). Then the cycle reverses. It does this 60 times per second (60Hz). The amperage in the hot and neutral wires are the same (in the perfect world). Only the hot wire is connected to the breaker. In a 240 volt circuit, there is no neutral wire. You are using two "legs" of 120 volts each that are 180 degrees out of phase with each other. In other words, as leg 1 is flowing "out", leg 2 is flowing "back". Because they are out of phase, the potential difference is twice the voltage of each line or 240 volts. The current flows out and back at the same 60 Hz but this time via the two hot wires (generally black and red). Each of these hot wires are connected to the two terminals of the two-pole breaker. Due to mechanical tolerances, one breaker will most likely trip before the other. Therefore, if the rated current, (100 amps), is exceeded on either breaker, that breaker will trip and the other breaker will trip via the mechanical tie. This ensures that all power to the outlet is disconnected. If you removed the tie and only one breaker tripped, there would still be 120 volts connected to the outlet. In summary, each leg of a single, double (2 phase) or triple (3 phase) breaker is capable of allowing the amount of current denoted on the breaker. The connected circuit, regardless of voltage is protected from exceeding that amperage.


What is the maximum sum of breaker amps in a 100 amp panel?

There is no particular limit. You could have 30 20-Amp breakers if the panel has enough room for them, or wire multiple 100-A panels together with as many 20-A breakers as you have branch circuits. Obviously the amount of simultaneous power utilization is not determined by the number of circuit breakers but rather by the main breaker rating. It is not uncommon to see 500 A or more of branch protection in a 100A system, meaning only that each BRANCH is protected for 15A, 20A, 30A (i.e., the overcurrent in those conductors and devices), not that you can ever use over 100A at the same time.


How do you run a 240V baseboard heater from a 100A box?

You are mixing Amps. and Watts. One is a factor of the other. Are You Asking About The Watts Or Voltage ? Most Baseboard Heaters Are 220 Volts. So Here Is The Way To Connect A 220 Volt. You Will Need A 2 Pole Circuit Breaket That Will Fit Your Panel. The Breaker Will Need To Be Of The Correct Amperage To Handle The Amperage Of The Heater. You Will Need 10 or 12 Guage Wire Again Depending On Amperage. If Over 20 Amps I Recommend You Use 10 Guage. The Amperage Should Be On The Heater. In The Connection End Of The Heater You Will Find ( most likely ) a Green Wire ( Put Your Raw Copper Ground Wire Here. A Red Or Black Put Either Of The Other Here. Also Use The Last Wire You Have To The Final Wire On The Heater. Also There Is A Diagram On The Plate On The Heater. In The Breaker Box. Be Sure To Turn Off The Main Circuit Breaker !! Then Test To Make Sure Your Have +++ Connect One Of The Insulated Wires To The Breaker, Then The Other Also Goes On The Breaker.On The Other Connection, You Will Have Two Connections On A 2 Pole Breaker, Connect The Copper Wire To The Ground Bar== Where You Find The Other Bare Wires Connected. Be Sure To Do This Correct. If You Have Any Doubt It Is Important You Get It Correct Or You Could Burn Your House Down. Also Where You Buy The Wire And Breaker They Can Help Bunches Too.


1200 watts 12 volt how many amps?

W - Watts E - Volts I - Amps E*I=W 1200W/12E=100A


If you plan to finish the basement of a 50 year old house do you need to upgrade the electricity from 100A service so that you can add 6 new outlets and dedicated circuits for appliances?

One thing to keep in mind when you talk of upgrading an electrical service. That is that a permit will have to be taken out, inspection made and the whole house will have to be brought up to current standards of the code. This could run into a large amount of money on a 50 year old house. Contact an electrical contractor for an estimate. A good contractor will not charge for this service. If there is a fee for this service move on to someone else as this guy will try to do things on the cheap and end up usually costing you more money. Consider a small 6 circuit sub panel if there are two spare circuit holes in the existing panel. This installation would be far less costly that a new service change. A new 200 amp service should be in the neighbourhood of $2000. That depends on what kind of appliance you plan on placing. 100 Amps sounds ample for 6 normal sockets if they are in parallel. For an item like a wasjher, dryer, oven etc.. you would need an independent circuit.

Related questions

How do you upgrade the service from a 120V 100A circuit breaker to 240V 30A for appliances like ovens and dryers?

Have an electrician wire you a proper line for the appliance. You were just kidding about the 100A, right? 10, or 20amp, not 100.


What size of electrical wire needed for 100A circuit breaker?

#2 copper


Do you need to upgrade the 100A service in your house to run power to a detached garage?

All depends on what type of equipment you are going to operate in the garage. I would suggest you call an electrician. You can connect to your existing 100 amp circuit if there is an empty spot for a breaker.


Can you change a 100 amp main breaker to a 200 amp main breaker if you also upgrade the service wire from the meter outside and your electrical panel itself is a brand new 100A box?

Your main breaker cannot exceed the rating of your panel.


If a 100a breaker keeps tripping?

If a 100 amp breaker keeps tripping there is an overload on the system.


What is circuit breaker and its type?

A circuit breaker(s) is what you will find inside your electrical box in your house the idea behind them is when a room in your house draws too many Amps the circuit breaker will turn off all the power to that room to re-engage them you simply switch it back on. There are many types of circuit breakers with different rattings like 15A or 100A, this tells you at what point they will 'break' the circuit and turn off the power.


What cause the Main Breaker trips when I start a 30KW 3-phase Motor(Star Delt Starter)?

The wiring is like this:[[30KW Motor ---- Star Delt Starter(100A Breaker inside) ----- 200A Breaker------50A Breaker(Inside the breaker box which located inside the factory) -----100A Main Breaker]]Once I try to start the Motor, the Main Breaker trips immediately.


What is moulded case circuit breaker?

Miniature circuit breaker is up to range of 100 A and smaller in current capacity in compared to MCCB. In MCCB the current carrying capacity less than 100A and other difference between MCB and MCCB is its making one is not moulded and second one is moulded


Is the amperage of a breaker for total amps combined or on each leg?

The breaker will trip at the amperage notated on the breaker. If it's 100A...it will trip at or around 100A. It does not matter if that breaker is physically tied to another 100A breaker. To understand this, imagine that you remove the mechanical tie from the two-pole breaker. Now you just have two 100A breakers. In actuality, you always had two 100A breakers. The mechanical tie does not change that. If you then powered two, separate 120 volt devices from the two breakers, each breaker would allow 100 amperes to pass to each of the devices before tripping. So why are they tied together? That is done when the two-pole breaker is to be used to power a 240 volt circuit. In AC current, electricity flows in both directions. In a 120 volt circuit, it flows "out" toward the device via the hot (generally the black wire) and "back" via the neutral (generally the white wire). Then the cycle reverses. It does this 60 times per second (60Hz). The amperage in the hot and neutral wires are the same (in the perfect world). Only the hot wire is connected to the breaker. In a 240 volt circuit, there is no neutral wire. You are using two "legs" of 120 volts each that are 180 degrees out of phase with each other. In other words, as leg 1 is flowing "out", leg 2 is flowing "back". Because they are out of phase, the potential difference is twice the voltage of each line or 240 volts. The current flows out and back at the same 60 Hz but this time via the two hot wires (generally black and red). Each of these hot wires are connected to the two terminals of the two-pole breaker. Due to mechanical tolerances, one breaker will most likely trip before the other. Therefore, if the rated current, (100 amps), is exceeded on either breaker, that breaker will trip and the other breaker will trip via the mechanical tie. This ensures that all power to the outlet is disconnected. If you removed the tie and only one breaker tripped, there would still be 120 volts connected to the outlet. In summary, each leg of a single, double (2 phase) or triple (3 phase) breaker is capable of allowing the amount of current denoted on the breaker. The connected circuit, regardless of voltage is protected from exceeding that amperage.


Is a 100A cicuit breaker sufficient for a small house?

I'm assuming you mean 100 amp service, not circuit breaker? The NEC code states the minimum service is 100A. Depending on your definition of "small", this would be sufficient. It all depends on your large loads too (Electric water heater, Air conditioner, electric range, etc). These appliances can pull some large amperage.


What is the max amps for a 4 gauge wire can 4 gauge feed a 100A breaker box?

Yes, # 4 AWG copper and 100 amps is the max.


Can you replace a 60amp box with a 100amp box if you swap the main breaker from 100 amp to 60 amp?

You would have to ensure that the service entrance cable can support 100A. Depending where you are located, you should inquire of your electricity provider if you are equipped for 100A. It may also require a meter change out.

People also asked