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The set of numbers which 3 does not belong is the set of even numbers.

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โˆ™ 2009-12-03 05:32:13
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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

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Q: Name the set of numbers which 3 does not belong?
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Which set of numbers does 3 over 10 belong to?

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What set of numbers does 5.86 belong to?

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What set of numbers does 4 belong?

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What set of numbers does 10 11 belong to?

Any set of numbers that contain them! For example, they belong to the set {10, 11} or {10, 11, sqrt(2), pi, -3/7}, or {10, 11, bananas, France, cold} or all whole numbers between 3 and 53, or counting numbers, or integers, or rational numbers, or real numbers, or complex numbers, etc.


How can a number belong to more than one set of numbers?

A set is just a way of describing numbers, and numbers can be described in more than one way. If set A is (for example) all positive prime numbers, and set B is all numbers between 0 and 10, then there are some numbers (2, 3, 5, and 7) that could belong to both sets.


What set does 0 belong to?

The mathematically correct answer is: any set that contains it. For example, it belongs to the set of all numbers between -3 and +2, the set {0, -3, 8/13, sqrt(97), pi}, the set {0}, the set of the roots of x3 - x2 + x = 0, the set of all integers, the set of all rational numbers, the set of all real numbers, the set of all complex numbers.


What sets does 3.1414 repeating Belong to?

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What number set does 5.385164807 belong to?

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Do 0 and 3 have closure for addition?

A set of numbers is considered to be closed if and only if you take any 2 numbers and perform an operation on them, the answer will belong to the same set as the original numbers, than the set is closed under that operation. If you add any 2 real numbers, your answer will be a real number, so the real number set is closed under addition. If you divide any 2 whole numbers, your answer could be a repeating decimal, which is not a whole number, and is therefore not closed. As for 0 and 3, the most specific set they belong to is the whole numbers (0, 1, 2, 3...) If you add 0 and 3, your answer is 3, which is also a whole number. Therefore, yes 0 and 3 are closed under addition


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