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The benchmarks in math are like tests to see if you understand and if the teacher teaches it good for you to understand

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โˆ™ 2010-12-16 00:13:33
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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

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Q: What are benchmarks in math?
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How do you use benchmarks to estimate decimals?

by estimating the number after the decimal


What is a convenient number used to replace fractions that are less than 1?

BenchMarks


List all benchmark fractions?

You have every right to be concerned, the descriptions "decimal benchmarks" and "fraction benchmarks" are open to many interpretations. In this case, make your own [reasonable] interpretations. If the fractional benchmarks where 1/100 , this is an exact fraction 23/100. If they are taken to be 1/2, 1/4, 1/5, etc., .23 is closer to 1/4, than any other, BUT it is also closer still to 2/9 [hence the confusion]. For decimal benchmarks, there is less confusion, but it is still there. If the benchmarks are .1, .2, .3, .4, .5, .6, .7, .8, .9 etc., the nearest one is .2. If the benchmarks are further refined [between .2 and .3], with .21, .22, .23, .24, ... then .23 coincides with a benchmark. This is not my work I got it from anthony@yahoo.com


What are benchmark fractions?

You have every right to be concerned, the descriptions "decimal benchmarks" and "fraction benchmarks" are open to many interpretations. In this case, make your own [reasonable] interpretations. If the fractional benchmarks where 1/100 , this is an exact fraction 23/100. If they are taken to be 1/2, 1/4, 1/5, etc., .23 is closer to 1/4, than any other, BUT it is also closer still to 2/9 [hence the confusion]. For decimal benchmarks, there is less confusion, but it is still there. If the benchmarks are .1, .2, .3, .4, .5, .6, .7, .8, .9 etc., the nearest one is .2. If the benchmarks are further refined [between .2 and .3], with .21, .22, .23, .24, ... then .23 coincides with a benchmark. This is not my work I got it from anthony@yahoo.com


What number has the same estimate when using benchmarks of thousands and ten thousands?

5000

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