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What does quarters mean?

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โˆ™ 2013-05-01 19:07:18

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It means cut into four equal parts or billeted. It was also a particularly nasty form of execution.

The actual procedure was to be 'hanged, drawn and quartered' and was a punishment in medieval England and Ireland for English commoners and any Scots, Irish or Welsh found guilty of high treason, until it was abolished in 1814. The punishment was not removed from Scottish law until 1947.

It didn't apply to women (except in the Isle of Man) who were dealt with by being burned alive at the stake until the 1790s, when they were hanged instead. Members of the English nobility were dealt with by being beheaded.

King Edward I is thought to have come up with the idea when he needed to teach Wales a lesson by causing his childhood companion, Daffyd, Prince of Wales, to be put to death in 1283 in an especially nasty and memorable manner, for turning against the English in general and his Majesty in particular.

The punishment itself consisted of being dragged, or drawn, naked on a wooden stretcher to the public execution area, where the people would gather, some raucously following the criminals as they were drawn through the streets. Food and beer was available for sale and it was a big day out for all.

On arrival at the public scaffold, the traitor was hanged just enough to hurt a lot but not enough to die. Then his genitals were cut off, he was disembowelled, and the whole mess was burned where he could see it close-up.

He was then beheaded and his body cut into four parts, and these five bits were stuck on poles or spikes, or otherwise hung from a highly-visible place as a warning to others contemplating treason. The head was simmered in salty water before display, so the traitors face would remain recognizable.

The execution of the Scot, William Wallace, in this manner was lovingly detailed at the time in 1305. His four body parts went to four different cities while his head (this time dipped in tar) was stuck on London Bridge.

In 1586, following the plot to overthrown Elizabeth I in favour of Mary, Queen of Scots, the traitors were condemned to the traditional torture but Elizabeth was so horrified when she heard the details of the first few executions she decreed the rest were to be hanged to death.

The last such execution in England was of the Scot, David Tyrie; the last man executed this way by the British in Ireland was Robert Emmet, in 1803, and after 1814 the sentence was amended to have traitors hanged to death and then cut up once they were dead.

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Oma Aufderhar

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โˆ™ 2022-12-07 02:46:47
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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

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Ethel Nitzsche

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โˆ™ 2021-08-29 17:38:33

The Quartering Act were used by the British forces in the American colonies to ensure that British troops had adequate housing and provisions.

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โˆ™ 2013-07-09 19:16:41

It means cut into four equal parts or billeted. It was also a particularly nasty form of execution.

The actual procedure was to be 'hanged, drawn and quartered' and was a punishment in medieval England and Ireland for English commoners and any Scots, Irish or Welsh found guilty of high treason, until it was abolished in 1814. The punishment was not removed from Scottish law until 1947.

It didn't apply to women (except in the Isle of Man) who were dealt with by being burned alive at the stake until the 1790s, when they were hanged instead. Members of the English nobility were dealt with by being beheaded.

King Edward I is thought to have come up with the idea when he needed to teach Wales a lesson by causing his childhood companion, Daffyd, Prince of Wales, to be put to death in 1283 in an especially nasty and memorable manner, for turning against the English in general and his Majesty in particular.

The punishment itself consisted of being dragged, or drawn, naked on a wooden stretcher to the public execution area, where the people would gather, some raucously following the criminals as they were drawn through the streets. Food and beer was available for sale and it was a big day out for all.

On arrival at the public scaffold, the traitor was hanged just enough to hurt a lot but not enough to die. Then his genitals were cut off, he was disembowelled, and the whole mess was burned where he could see it close-up.

He was then beheaded and his body cut into four parts, and these five bits were stuck on poles or spikes, or otherwise hung from a highly-visible place as a warning to others contemplating treason. The head was simmered in salty water before display, so the traitors face would remain recognizable.

The execution of the Scot, William Wallace, in this manner was lovingly detailed at the time in 1305. His four body parts went to four different cities while his head (this time dipped in tar) was stuck on London Bridge.

In 1586, following the plot to overthrown Elizabeth I in favour of Mary, Queen of Scots, the traitors were condemned to the traditional torture but Elizabeth was so horrified when she heard the details of the first few executions she decreed the rest were to be hanged to death.

The last such execution in England was of the Scot, David Tyrie; the last man executed this way by the British in Ireland was Robert Emmet, in 1803, and after 1814 the sentence was amended to have traitors hanged to death and then cut up once they were dead.

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โˆ™ 2015-03-13 23:19:02

'Quarter' has many definitions . Possibly most common is to divide anything into 4 parts. Each part is then 'a quarter' . Another more old fashioned meaning is to be lenient to an enemy you have beaten, (to give quarter). Another in the sense of the British military at least is military living places (quarters)

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โˆ™ 2008-12-02 00:35:40

1/4 or 25%

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