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Arithmetic is another name for math.

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โˆ™ 2013-04-10 21:51:56
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Q: What is aritmetic?
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What is the aritmetic average of the first twenty-three odd numbers?

The 12th odd number.


What lessons were taught in Victorian schools?

They had Aritmetic. (English) They had Decimation. (Maths) Art


What has the author William Rickard written?

William Rickard has written: 'The miner's manual of aritmetic and surveying..'


What does aritmetic sequence mean?

An arithmetic sequence is an ordered set of numbers such that the difference between any two successive members of the set is a constant.


What does The Devil's Aritmetic mean?

"The Devil's Arithmetic" is a story and film about the holocaust. The title refers to the fact that each day another person is brought to the gas chamber is another day the others can live.


Find the sum of the first 48 terms of an aritmetic sequance 2 4 6 8?

Sum of 1st 2 terms, A2 = 2 + 4 = 6 Sum of 1st 3 terms, A3 = 2 + 4 + 6 = 12 Sum of 1st 4 terms A4 = 2 + 4 + 6 + 12 = 20 you can create a formula for the sum of the 1st n terms of this sequence Sum of 1st n terms of this sequence = n2 + n so the sum of the first 48 terms of the sequence is 482 + 48 = 2352


What are four parts of a computer?

Input storage processing output The above is almost correct. Actually, it's the closest I've seen to the correct answer. The question is actually 40+ years old and was asked of me in an engineering class back in 1968. Back then it was 'What are the 5 parts of a computer.' Storage is too vague. The answer here is memory. Technically s computer does NOT need storage, aka a hard drive or a floppy etc to be a computer. It needs: CPU (for processing commands) Input (from a keyboard, or a floppy, a hard drive etc to input both commands and data) Output ( to a monitor, a printer, magnetic tape, paper tape, punch cards etc) Memory ( the place an actual program and or data that the CPU uses MUST reside) The 5th item I alluded to is the Arithmetic Processor. The CPU proocesses the commands while the Arithmetic Processor manipulates the data to add, subtract, multiply and divide. In today's computers (post-1985) the CPU and the Arithmetic Processor are on the same chip. Previously, for those who remember the Z80 and the 8080 processors, for more "computing power" you could install an Aritmetic Processor to upgrade the PC and give the built-in arithemtic processor more capability.


When do you use a variable in n expression instead of a number?

1) When a quantity (variable n) in an equation is not know and you are trying to evaluate it. For example, if a banana costs 5 cents, how many can you buy for 25 cents. We solve this by saying Let n be the number of bananas that we can buy for 25 cents, then we have 5 x n = 25 and hence n = (25/5) = 5 2) When you want to express the general term in a series. For example the arithmetic series 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16,.......... is really 1, (1+3), (1+6), (1+9), (1+12), (1+15).......... and in general for such an arithmetic series you can find the 100th, 223rd, 567th term without writing down the long chain of numbers. How? we see a pattern in the arithmetic series. If we represent the starting number (1 in our case) as "a"and the equal increment from one term to the next (that's how an aritmetic series is defined) as "r" then the formlua "a + (n-1)r" gives you the n-th number. Remember that in the illustration above 1 is considered the 1st term in the series, (1+3) is the2nd term, (1+6) is the3rd term and so on.


How do you xxplain the 5 operation of a computer and communication system?

CPU ,memory,hard disk, display,mailboardThe above is partially correct. The question is actually 40+ years old and was asked of me in an engineering class back in 1968. Back then it was 'What are the 5 parts of a computer.'Technically s computer does NOT need storage, aka a hard drive or a floppy etc to be a computer. It also doesn't need a display nor a mailboard. How mailboard got here I don't know.It needs:CPU (for processing commands)Input (from a keyboard, or a floppy, a hard drive etc to input both commands and data)Output ( to a monitor, a printer, magnetic tape, paper tape, punch cards etc)Memory ( the place an actual program and or data that the CPU uses MUST reside)The 5th item I alluded to is the Arithmetic Processor. The CPU proocesses the commands while the Arithmetic Processor manipulates the data to add, subtract, multiply and divide. In today's computers (post-1985) the CPU and the Arithmetic Processor are on the same chip. Previously, for those who remember the Z80 and the 8080 processors, for more "computing power" you could install an Aritmetic Processor to upgrade the PC and give the built-in arithemtic processor more capability.


How would you know if a function is linear or non-linear just by looking at a input-output table?

I don't know that you can do it just by looking at one. (At least, I'm not clever enough with arithmetic to do that.) But it's possible to do it using some simple aritmetic. Here's an input-output table.5 386 457 528 59The first thing I notice is that the numbers in the left-hand column are evenly spaced; the difference between any two of them is just one. The differences between all of the numbers in the right-hand column are also all the same, seven. So this input-output table represents a linear function.In case you're working in a slightly more advanced situation here's another example:3 117 239 2913 41In this case the left-hand column numbers are not evenly spaced and I can't just look at the differences between the numbers on the left. However, there's a slightly more advanced technique that I can apply.( 23 - 11 ) / ( 7 - 3 ) = 12 / 4 = 3( 29 - 23 ) / ( 9 - 7 ) = 6 / 2 = 3( 41 - 29 ) / ( 13 - 9 ) = 12 / 4 = 3The three slopes are the same. Therefore, the input-output table represents a linear function.


What are parts that work together in a computer are called the computer?

What most people generally consider a "computer" consists of several things: the outsides or peripherals (monitor, mouse, keyboard etc), and the insides or components (power supply, graphics card, motherboard, memory, hard drive, floppy drive, CD drive). While it is possible to have a computer without one or more of these items, most computers have these, as well as others The above is a VERY good answer because Rashean29 is smart enough to know that many 'extra' items are not needed for a computer to be a true computer. The question is actually 40+ years old and was asked of me in an engineering class back in 1968. Back then it was 'What are the 5 parts of a computer.'Technically s computer does NOT need storage, aka a hard drive or a floppy etc to be a computer. It also only needs 1 input device and 1 output device to be 'functional.' Most computers today have multiples in each of those categories.It needs:CPU (for processing commands)Input (from a keyboard, or a floppy, a hard drive etc to input both commands and data)Output ( to a monitor, a printer, magnetic tape, paper tape, punch cards etc)Memory ( the place an actual program and or data that the CPU uses MUST reside)The 5th item I alluded to is the Arithmetic Processor. The CPU proocesses the commands while the Arithmetic Processor manipulates the data to add, subtract, multiply and divide. In today's computers (post-1985) the CPU and the Arithmetic Processor are on the same chip. Previously, for those who remember the Z80 and the 8080 processors, for more "computing power" you could install an Aritmetic Processor to upgrade the PC and give the built-in arithemtic processor more capability.


What do you mean by Hierarchy in C language?

The preference in which arithematic operations are performed in an arithematic expression is called as Hierarchy of operations.Its very important in C Programming to predefine the Hierarchy of operations to the C compiler in order to solve the given arithematic expression correctly.e.g.: If a programmer wishes to perform ,z=a+b/c;it may beinterpretedas z=(a+b)/c or z=a+(b/c).and if a=3,b=6,c=2 then using the same expression we will obtain two differentanswersas z=4.5 or z=6.To avoid this condition we must be aware of hierarchy of operations used in C programming.In arithematic expressions scanning is always done from left to right.The priority of operations is as shown below,PriorityOperatorsFirstParenthesisos brackets()SecondMultiplication & DivisionThirdAddition & SubtractionFourthAssignment i.e.=If we consider the logical operators used in C language,the operator precedence will be like;OperatorsType!Logical NOT* / %Arithmetic and moulus+ -AritmeticRelational== !=Relational&&Logical ANDLogical OR=AssignmentIn the tables above,the higher the position of an operator,higher is its priority.


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