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d/dx ∫ f(x) dx = f(x)

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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

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Q: What is the derivative with respect to x of the integral of a function of x with respect to x?
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Related questions

What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of a function of x with respect to x?

∫ d/dx f(x) dx = f(x) + C C is the constant of integration.


What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of a function of x divided by that same function of x with respect to x?

∫ f'(x)/f(x) dx = ln(f(x)) + C C is the constant of integration.


What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of a function of x multiplied by another function of x with respect to x?

∫ f'(x)g(x) dx = f(x)g(x) - ∫ f(x)g/(x) dx This is known as integration by parts.


How do you integrate functions?

To integrate a function you find what the function you have is the derivative of. for example the derivative of x^2 is 2x. so the integral of 2x is x^2.


What is the integral of a function of x raised to the power of n multiplied by the derivative with respect to x of that same function of x with respect to x?

∫ f(x)nf'(x) dx = f(x)n + 1/(n + 1) + C n ≠ -1 C is the constant of integration.


What is the answer of 1 divide by x square?

What do you mean? As this is a calculus question, I presume that you are asking for a derivative or integral The derivative of any function of the form ƒ(x) = a * x ^ n is ƒ'(x) = a * n * x ^ (n-1) The integral of any function of the form ∫ a*x ^ n is a / (n+1) * x ^ (n+1) + C Your function that you gave is 1 / x^(2) which is equal to: x^(-2) Thus the derivative is: -2 * x^(-3) And the integral is: -x^(-1) + C


What is the relationship of integral and differential calculus?

We say function F is an anti derivative, or indefinite integral of f if F' = f. Also, if f has an anti-derivative and is integrable on interval [a, b], then the definite integral of f from a to b is equal to F(b) - F(a) Thirdly, Let F(x) be the definite integral of integrable function f from a to x for all x in [a, b] of f, then F is an anti-derivative of f on [a,b] The definition of indefinite integral as anti-derivative, and the relation of definite integral with anti-derivative, we can conclude that integration and differentiation can be considered as two opposite operations.


What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of the function f divided by the square root of the quantity a times f plus b with respect to x?

∫ f'(x)/√(af(x) + b) dx = 2√(af(x) + b)/a + C C is the constant of integration.


What is the derivative of 4xy3?

The derivative with respect to 'x' is 4y3 . The derivative with respect to 'y' is 12xy2 .


What is the integral of the derivative with respect to x of the function f divided by the square root of the quantity f squared plus a constant with respect to x?

∫ f'(x)/√[f(x)2 + a] dx = ln[f(x) + √(f(x)2 + a)] + C C is the constant of integration.


What is the difference between the differentiation of the function and the partial differentiation of the function?

You can differentiate a function when it only contains one changing variable, like f(x) = x2. It's derivative is f'(x) = 2x. If a function contains more than one variable, like f(x,y) = x2 + y2, you can't just "find the derivative" generically because that doesn't specify what variable to take the derivative with respect to. Instead, you might "take the derivative with respect to x (treating y as a constant)" and get fx(x,y) = 2x or "take the derivative with respect to y (treating x as a constant)" and get fy(x,y) = 2y. This is a partial derivative--when you take the derivative of a function with many variable with respect to one of the variables while treating the rest as constants.


What is the anti-derivative of the absolute value of x over x?

For positive x, this expression is equal to 1. The integral (anti-derivative) is therefore x + C (where C is the arbitrary integration constant). For negative x, this expression is equal to -1, and the integral is -x + C. Wolfram Alpha gives the integral as x times sgn(x), where sgn(x) is the "sign" function.

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