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It is: 1 to 2

area = 4*pi*radius squared and volume = 4/3*pi*radius cubed

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โˆ™ 2013-01-17 15:00:32
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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

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Q: What the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere is?
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Related questions

What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with the following measurements. Surface area equals 300 m2 Volume equals 500 m3?

0.6 m-1 is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere.


What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with the following measurements surface area 300m2 volume 500m3?

0.6 is the surface area to volume ratio.


Why does a sphere have the lowest surface area to volume ratio?

because the surface area is spread out over the volume of mass


What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with surface area and volume m?

If they have the same radius then it is: 3 to 2


Which geometric shape has the lowest surface area to volume ratio?

a sphere


How do you find what the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere is?

1) Calculate the area 2) Calculate the volume 3) Divide the area by the volume to get the ratio


What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with the following measurements surface area 588m2 volume 1372m3?

-- The ratio of 588 to 1,372 is 0.4286 (rounded) -- A sphere with surface area of 588 has volume closer to 1,340.7 . (rounded)


What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with the surface area is 432m2 and volume is 864m3?

A sphere can either have a surface area of 432 m2 but not a volume of 864 m3, or it can have a volume of 864 m3 but not a surface area of 432 m2.


Surface-area-to-volume ratio in nanoparticles?

Surface area to volume ratio in nanoparticles have a significant effect on the nanoparticles properties. Firstly, nanoparticles have a relative larger surface area when compared to the same volume of the material. For example, let us consider a sphere of radius r: The surface area of the sphere will be 4πr2 The volume of the sphere = 4/3(πr3) Therefore the surface area to the volume ratio will be 4πr2/{4/3(πr3)} = 3/r It means that the surface area to volume ration increases with the decrease in radius of the sphere and vice versa.


What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with the following measurements surface area 432m square volume 864m Square?

-- "864m square" is not a volume. "864m cubed" is a volume.-- A sphere can't have those measurements.If it's really a sphere with surface area of 432 m2, then its volume is 844.3 m3.If it's really a sphere with volume 864 m3, then its surface area is 438.7 m2.-- The answer to the question is: The ratio of 432 m2 to 864 m2 is 0.5 .-- If those are really an area and a volume, then the ratio of 432 m2 to 864 m3 is 0.5 per meter.


What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with the Surface area of 300m2 and a volume of 500 m3?

Well, first of all, that's no sphere.-- A sphere with surface area = 300 has volume = 488.6.-- A sphere needs surface area of 304.6 in order to have volume = 500.But this is just a ratio exercise, not a geometry problem, so we'll just use the numbersgiven in the question. It's just some sort of wacky humongous paramecium:Surface area = 300Volume = 500Ratio of (surface area)/(volume) = 300/500 = 0.6 .


What is the ratio of surface area to volume for a sphere with the following measurements Surface area equals 588 m2Volume equals 1372 m3?

0.4 m-1 is the ration of surface area 588m2 to volume 1372m3 for a sphere.

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