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As the acceleration is uniform, the train has an average speed that is half the difference between the start and final velocities, which in this case is half the final velocity.

1 hr = 60 min

1 km/h = 1 km ÷ 1 hr

= km ÷ 60 min

= 1/60 km/min

Distance = velocity × time

= (½ × 72 × 1/60 km/min) × (5 min)

= 36/60 × 5 km

= 3 km

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3 kilometres.

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Q: A train starting from rest attains a velocity of 72Km hr in 5 minutes. Assuming that the acceleration is uniform what is the distance travel by train while attained the velocity?
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