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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

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Q: Do Through a point not on a line one and only one line always can be drawn parallel to the given line?
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Related questions

How do you negate the euclidean parallel postulate?

Assume there are no lines through a given point that is parallel to a given line or assume that there are many lines through a given point that are parallel to a given line. There exist a line l and a point P not on l such that either there is no line m parallel to l through P or there are two distinct lines m and n parallel to l through P.


A given line is always parallel to itself?

False.


Through a given point not on a given line there is exactly one line parallel to the given line?

The Playfair Axiom (or "Parallel Postulate")


Which conjecture justifies the construction of a line parallel to a given line through a given point?

Euclid's parallel postulate.


What postulate is not of euclidean geometry?

Euclidean Geometry is based on the premise that through any point there is only one line that can be drawn parallel to another line. It is based on the geometry of the Plane. There are basically two answers to your question: (i) Through any point there are NO lines that can be drawn parallel to a given line (e.g. the geometry on the Earth's surface, where a line is defined as a great circle. (Elliptic Geometry) (ii) Through any point, there is an INFINITE number of lines that can be drawn parallel of a given line. (I think this is referred to as Riemannian Geometry, but someone else needs to advise us on this) Both of these are fascinating topics to study.


Is it possible to construct a line that is parallel to any given line and that passes through a point that is not on the given line?

Yes. That's always possible, but there's only one of them.


How many lines are parallel to a given line through a given point?

zero


Through a point not on the line exactly one line can be drawn parallel to the?

... given line. This is one version of Euclid's fifth postulate, also known as the Parallel Postulate. It is quite possible to construct consistent systems of geometry where this postulate is negated - either many parallel lines or none.


How many lines can be drawn perpendicular to a given like through a point not on the given line?

In Geometry


Who restated Euclid's 5th postulate?

Probably the best known equivalent of Euclid's parallel postulate, contingent on his other postulates, is Playfair's axiom, named after the Scottish mathematician John Playfair, which states:In a plane, given a line and a point not on it, at most one line parallel to the given line can be drawn through the point.


What is an equation in slope-intercept form for the line that passes through the given point and is parallel to the given line?

Write an equation in slope-intercept form for the line that passes through the given point and is parallel to the given line (-7,3); x=4


What is eullidean geometry?

"Euclidean" geometry is the familiar "standard" geometry. Until the 19th century, it was simply "geometry". It features infinitely divisible space, up to three dimensions, and, most notably, the "parallel postulate": "Given a line, and a point not on the line, there is exactly one line that can be drawn through the point and parallel to the given line."

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