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They are called faces of the polyhedron.

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โˆ™ 2017-03-08 16:55:06
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Algebra

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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

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Q: What polygons make up a solid is called?
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Continue Learning about Other Math

What types of polygons make up a tessellation?

Any polygon will have versions that will tessellate.


What is the name of the line segments that make up a triangle?

The line segments that make up any polygon are called its sides.


What is a net in maths?

A net is an arrangement of polygons, joined edge-to-edge, that when folded up, form the surface of a polyhedron.


How many sides does regular exterior polygon have?

There is no such thing as an exterior polygon. "Exterior" means outer. Polygons can have exterior angles, but that is about it!A regular polygon can have 3 or more sides - up to infinitely many.There is no such thing as an exterior polygon. "Exterior" means outer. Polygons can have exterior angles, but that is about it!A regular polygon can have 3 or more sides - up to infinitely many.There is no such thing as an exterior polygon. "Exterior" means outer. Polygons can have exterior angles, but that is about it!A regular polygon can have 3 or more sides - up to infinitely many.There is no such thing as an exterior polygon. "Exterior" means outer. Polygons can have exterior angles, but that is about it!A regular polygon can have 3 or more sides - up to infinitely many.


What ancient Greek mathematician came up with an approximate value for pi by circumscribing and inscribing circles in and around regular polygons?

Archimedes (287-212 BC) was the first to estimate π rigorously. He realized that its magnitude can be bounded from below and above by inscribing circles in regular polygons and calculating the outer and inner polygons' respective perimeters. By using the equivalent of 96-sided polygons, he proved that 310/71< π < 31/7. The average of these values is about 3.14185.

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