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cosx + sinx = 0 when sinx = -cosx.

By dividing both sides by cosx you get:

sinx/cosx = -1

tanx = -1

The values where tanx = -1 are 3pi/4, 7pi/4, etc.

Those are equivalent to 135 degrees, 315 degrees, etc.

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โˆ™ 2009-12-26 15:14:04
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Algebra

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A polynomial of degree zero is a constant term

The grouping method of factoring can still be used when only some of the terms share a common factor A True B False

The sum or difference of p and q is the of the x-term in the trinomial

A number a power of a variable or a product of the two is a monomial while a polynomial is the of monomials

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Q: Cos x plus sin x equals 0?
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